Published on 12 January 2019

CSR

The state of world in 10 key figures

10% of people are living in extreme poverty, 2.7 billion women are without work, 50% of school-age children are undereducated…but there is also better access to financial services and electricity. The World Bank has given us a contrasting view of our civilisation in 2019.

The World Bank reveals “pathways to peace” for a more inclusive world
@NicoElNino

LESS THAN 10% OF THE WORLD IS IN EXTREME POVERTY…

As 2018 comes to an end, extreme poverty is at the lowest level in recorded history”, highlights the World Bank report, which has chosen to put this criterion at the top of its list.

Today, less than 10% of the global population lives on less than $1.90 per day, compared to 37% in 1990.

…EXCEPT IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, WHERE THAT FIGURE CLIMBS TO 41%

Sub-Saharan Africa, however, is experiencing the exact opposite with “the number of people living in extreme poverty having increased from 278 million in 1990 to 413 million in 2015”.  It’s the only region where this figure has increased.  Out of the 28 poorest countries, 27 are on the African continent.  Worst, Nigeria will be comprised of more people in poverty than India, despite its population being 7 times smaller.

91% OF THE WORLD POPULATION IS EXPOSED TO ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTION

According to data from the World Health Organisation covering 4,300 cities and populated areas in 108 countries, more than nine out of ten people breathe polluted air. The regions most seriously impacted are the Eastern Mediterranean regions and South-East Asia. “7 million people die each year due to air pollution”, with 90% of these deaths occurring in low-income countries.

33% OF GLOBAL WASTE IS BURNED OR LEFT UNTREATED

In low-income countries, “93% of wasted is burned or abandoned on the streets, open areas or water channels, and only 2% in higher-income countries”, reports the World Bank. On average globally, “local authorities can only cover 50% of the investment costs necessary for proper waste management”.

2.6 BILLION PEOPLE DO NOT HAVE ACCESS TO TOILETTES AND CLEAN WATER

Poor sanitation is responsible for 1.6 million deaths each year and contributes to stunted growth, affecting 150 million children worldwide. The World Bank has already invested $10 billion on tackling this issue.

LESS THAN 50% OF SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN ACHIEVE MINIMUM ACADEMIC PROFICIENCY LEVELS

The World Bank aligned international student evaluations in 160 countries. “The average scores range from 600 in the highest performing countries, to 300 in the lowest performing countries (a score of 400 represents the minimum academic proficiency level)”, according to the institution’s calculations.  Moreover, 260 million children and adolescents are not educated at all.

2.7 BILLION WOMEN ARE EXCLUDED FROM THE LABOUR MARKET

In 123 countries there are no laws to stop sexual harassment in education, and 59 countries don't legislate against it in the workplace. In 18 countries husbands have the legal right to prevent their wives from working”, reports the World Bank. Nevertheless, during the last two years, 87 legislative reforms have been adopted in 65 countries in order to improve women’s economic inclusion.

63% OF ADULTS DO NOT HAVE ACCESS TO A FINANCIAL SERVICE

Access to banking services is indispensable according to the World Bank, especially in order to participate in the digital economy. The access rate for adults increased from 54% to 63% between 2014 and 2017, however, almost one-third of adults (1.7 billion people) remain excluded from the financial system.  Women are more affected than men.

13% OF THE WORLD POPULATION STILL LIVES WITHOUT ELECTRICITY

This represents one billion individuals primarily situated in rural areas of Sub-Saharan Africa, Central Asia and South Asia. Nevertheless, the world is making great progress in this area with 118 million new household connections per year. “40 countries have already achieved universal access since 2010”, confirmed the World Bank, who puts emphasis on network development but also isolated battery-operated systems.

68.5 MILLION FORCED DISPLACEMENTS IN ONE YEAR

Massive migration is far from only impacting European borders. In 2017, 43.1 million people migrated from their countries of origin, whereas 25.4 million actually reached their intended borders. “Contrary to popular belief, 85% of these refugees are located in developing countries”, affirmed the World Bank. The country with the highest rate of refugees is Lebanon, where one in four habitants is Syrian.  Global warming could force 150 million “climate migrants” to be displaced from their homes by 2050.

Ludovic Dupin, @LudovicDupin

 

 


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