Published on 11 January 2019

CSR

Maersk, the world's leading container shipping company, aims for carbon neutrality in 2050

This is a strong signal sent to the entire maritime sector, about its climate commitments. Denmark's Maersk, world leader in container shipping, announced at COP24 in December 2018 that it is committed to carbon neutrality by 2050, thus meeting one of the objectives of the Paris Agreement. And putting a lot of pressure on its competitors.

Maersk conteneurs David Martin Creative Commons Licence
The climate is one of the biggest problems in the world and, transporting about 80% of world trade, the shipping industry is essential to find solutions
@David Martin

Achieving Carbon Neutrality in 2050 is the new climate commitment of Denmark's Maersk, the world's largest container company. To achieve this goal, mentioned in the Paris Agreement, the company will invest in carbon neutral and commercially viable vessels by 2030.

"The climate is one of the biggest problems in the world and, transporting about 80% of world trade, the shipping industry is essential to find solutions," says Søren Toft, deputy general manager of Maersk. "The only way to achieve decarbonisation is to switch completely to new fuels and new carbon-neutral supply chains."

As the lifespan of a vessel is 20 to 25 years, the marine sector must now develop new types of vessels to
achieve cleaner transport in 2050. "The next five to ten years will be crucial", continues Søren Toft.

$ 1 billion invested per year

"We will invest significant resources in fleet innovation and technology to improve the technical and financial viability of carbon-free solutions. In the last four years, we have invested approximately $ 1 billion and hired more than 50 engineers each year in the development and deployment of energy-efficient
solutions.
"

But in the future, "we cannot do it alone," he warns, counting on the commitment of the entire maritime sector. Last April, the 173 Member States of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) finally agreed to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2050, compared to the 2008 level. It was the last sector of the world economy to stay away from the Paris Agreement.

According to a recent OECD report, it would be technically feasible to decarbonize shipping by 2035 using
biofuels and renewable energy, improving the energy efficiency of ships or reducing the speed of ships. Divide it by two would indeed consume four to five times less energy. The toxic emissions of maritime transport are responsible for 400,000 premature deaths each year worldwide.


Concepcion Alvarez, @ conce1

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